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Becoming Mrs. Lewis (Review)

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The love story of C. S. Lewis and his only wife, Helen Joy Davidman Gresham, was improbable-and seemingly impossible. Their Eros-story led to some of C. S. Lewis’s greatest works on love, grief, and faith, yet Joy is most commonly known for how she died. Becoming Mrs. Lewis allows us to see how this brilliant and passionate woman lived-and why she stole Jack’s heart.

In a most improbable friendship, she found love. In a world where women were silenced, she found her voice. In a God beyond the religion of her birth, she found faith.

From New York Times bestselling author Patti Callahan comes an exquisite novel of Joy Davidman, the woman C. S. Lewis called “my whole world.” When poet and writer Joy Davidman began writing letters to C. S. Lewis-known as Jack-she was looking for spiritual answers, not love. Love, after all, wasn’t holding together her crumbling marriage. Everything about New Yorker Joy seemed ill-matched for an Oxford don and the beloved writer of Narnia, yet their minds bonded over their letters. Embarking on the adventure of her life, Joy traveled from America to England and back again, facing heartbreak and poverty, discovering friendship and faith, and against all odds, finding a love that even the threat of death couldn’t destroy.

In this masterful exploration of one of the greatest love stories of modern times, we meet a brilliant writer, a fiercely independent mother, and a passionate woman who changed the life of this respected author and inspired books that still enchant us and change us. Joy lived at a time when women weren’t meant to have a voice-and yet her love for Jack gave them both voices they didn’t know they had.

At once a fascinating historical novel and a glimpse into a writer’s life, Becoming Mrs. Lewis is above all a love story-a love of literature and ideas, a love of God, and a love between a husband and wife that, in the end, was not impossible at all.

4

It’s always disappointing when a book you were looking so forward to doesn’t live up to your expectations. I had been looking forward to this one since I’d first heard about it. As a child, I admit, I didn’t enjoy C.S Lewis that much; but as an adult, I am always keen to get a look into the lives of people I previously was ‘meh‘ about. I knew little of him–and I still do–and I knew nothing of his personal life nor his marriage to Joy. I was keen to get a look at that site of him.

Sadly, what I got was one of the most self-centered and irritating main characters ever. Now, it bears saying that in real life they may be totally different, so my review here simply covers the fictional version of the Lewises.

This was a rare DNF for me; which ass I said is a pity. Where did I go wrong? I just could not get into this. Perhaps it was because I found I couldn’t find anything about Joy that I liked. I also found her name ironic as she seemed to have little ‘joy’ in her life. I found ‘Jack’ just as irritable. Joy was one of those characters who need a good shaking and maybe a slap. She left her first husband and had the audacity to be mad when said husband moved on. (That annoyed me thoroughly.)

You guys don’t know how much I wanted to love this…well, I’m sure you do. You can just take this title out and replace it with something you looked forward to and didn’t reach your expectations.

Also, the flashbang conversion to being religious was something. I mean, it literally just happened. Then the going over it in letters…I lost interest.

I would like to say I would read another of the author’s books; clearly, she cares deeply for the subject of her story and the research was sublime. I just didn’t enjoy this.

  • I’d give it ★ star. 😦
  • I received this in exchange for an honest review.
  • I did recommend this to a friend. Just because I didn’t enjoy it doesn’t mean other people won’t.

 

1 thought on “Becoming Mrs. Lewis (Review)”

  1. Oh… dear! See, now… this never interested me because I never read C.S. Lewis as a kid (my father didn’t appreciate the Christian undertones of his work). At least I know I’m not missing anything! Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

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